Saturday, July 9, 2016

My Very First Guest Blogger!

Hi fellow crafters,
My name is Monisa and I have been making cards for three years. Kathy is my Stampin Up dealer demo and she faithfully answers all of my stupid SU questions, sometimes repeatedly! She is the best demo ever. Kathy has let me take over her blog for this post because I made a card that I LOVE and I am dying to share it with you all. 
A friend recently asked me to make ten blank cards. He plans to give them as a gift to a woman whose husband passed away earlier this year. So my goal was to create a set of cards that was bright, beautiful, fun and elegant. This card met the bright and elegant requirements.
When the new Stampin Up catalogue launched in the spring, I immediately fell in love with the Floral Boutique DSP and bought it as soon as I could. It’s monochromatic. It’s floral. It’s minimalist. And has a slightly nautical feel. What’s not to love?
floral boutique dsp

I also wanted to create a triptych card. From Wikipedia, a triptych (from the Greek adjective "triptukhon" ("three-fold"), from tri, i.e., "three" and ptysso, i.e., "to fold" or ptyx, i.e., "fold") is a work of art (usually a panel painting) that is divided into three sections, or three carved panels that are hinged together and can be folded shut or displayed open. I love triptychs and can’t really explain why. Something about the symmetry and the odd number of the arrangement is very pleasing to my eyeballs and to my soul. I’m not the only one who thinks so. Here are some famous triptychs you might have seen:
The Triptych of the Temptation of St. Anthony, by Heironymous Bosch
Triptych of the Temptation of St. Anthony, by Heironymous Bosch

Rubens's Elevation of the Cross (and Descent from the Cross) in Antwerp Cathedral.
Elevation of the Cross by P.P. Rubens

The Mérode Altarpiece at the Cloisters in New York.
Merode altarpiece Master of Flemalle

In fact, I took a photo at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia in 2011 and turned it into a triptych as a reminder of my retirement plan.  It hangs in my living room above the TV. Nobody pays me to look at it but I enjoy it!

I don’t think I have ever made a triptych card before and I now have a new appreciation for the dimensions. It was harder than I thought to figure out how wide each piece should be and also how far apart. There was a lot of paper trimming and adjusting of layout. Oh look, my off cuts are showing!


In the end, I decided that the dsp panels could be no narrower than 1.25” because I didn’t want to lose too much of the beautiful florals. I wanted the panels to look long and skinny so I decided on just over double the width at 2.75” long. Maintaining a minimum distance of 0.25” around for the border, that meant my Night of Navy framing pieces* had to be 1.5” x 3”.


Then came the finicky (or, if you’re like me, fun) part – getting the layout right. I would be lying if I said this was easy. It took me a while but I have taken the guess work out for you. A handy trick is to centre your card at 8” on your grid paper. If you have to physically count the squares, do that. I did.

Then start laying out your panels. I decided I wanted ¼” on either side which left a 1/8” gap between the panels. But you could easily centre them on the dsp which works out to about 3/8” either side as shown below.

Now, I know it looks a bit wonky but I think that’s just because of the wavy lines on the dsp. Or maybe it’s just my eyeballs. But that’s what the ruler is for!
Here is my card with dimensions for your Pinning reference:

And voila, my final showcase photo!

I hope you attempt this card too. If you do, please find me and tag me on Pinterest or Instagram @monisamade.

*Funny story. When I sat down to recreate this card and take photos for this post, my stash of Night of Navy had disappeared. I used a slightly different (non SU) blue so you get the idea. If anyone can come over and organize my stamp room, preferably with built in closets, please do!

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